Click the link below the picture

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The art school’s brief run in Germany shows not a simple dichotomy, but rather how, to varying degrees of bravery, individuals tried to survive under tyranny.

“Together let us call for, devise, and create the construction of the future, comprising everything in one form: architecture, sculpture and painting,” Walter Gropius declared in the Bauhaus Manifesto of 1919.

There are few symbols of Modernist design and architecture more iconic that his Bauhaus building in Dessau. And the structure did become that future; the epicenter of a design approach, style, and philosophy that permeates so much of the present. And yet, for many years, the building was derelict. The future Gropius had dreamed of seemed to have bitterly failed when the school had been closed by the Nazis in 1932, and turned into a bombed-out husk by 1945.

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The Nazis’ attempts to erase the Bauhaus through actions such as its demolition of Gropius’s “Monument to the March Dead” (1922) ultimately failed, but fate was cruel to some of its memebers. Wikimedia Commons

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Click the link below for the article:

https://www.citylab.com/design/2019/03/walter-gropius-bauhaus-art-school-nazi-germany-anniversary/583999/

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