Click the link below the picture

.

Brené Brown wants me to watch Unforgotten, a British TV series I’ve never heard of. She also likes Catastrophe and loves Fleabag, though she requests I spoil her on the first season’s twist ending. (Her hunch was accurate.) She can’t watch Game of Thrones (too violent) or The Act (“I have a child-protective services background!”)—but she also wants me to catch up on Hulu’s National Treasure, which I forgot existed, and gushes about The Good Fight, “some of the smartest television on right now.”

Nine-ish hours earlier, the blonde, sparkling-eyed 53-year-old former competitive swimmer had been on CBS This Morning; the night before, I had watched her in conversation with The New York Times’s Melena Ryzik. But when I told Brown I write about TV for Vanity Fair, she lit up—and grilled me about my favorite shows, turning the tables before we had even started.

Which is funny, because Brown is a TV star herself. In April, Netflix debuted Brené Brown: The Call to Courage, a roughly hour-long special about how bravery arises from engaging with our deepest vulnerabilities. It builds upon Brown’s earlier work: two viral TED Talks and several books, including the best-sellers Dare to Lead, The Gifts of Imperfection, and the most popular one of all, Daring Greatly. Their essential themes are the same. The path to a meaningful, loving life comes through a willingness to be vulnerable—and a rejection of the socially produced shame that convinces us we, or our vulnerabilities, are not worthy of love.

.

By Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP/REX/Shutterstock.

.

.

Click the link below for the article:

https://www.vanityfair.com/hollywood/2019/05/brene-brown-netflix-call-to-courage-interview?utm_source=pocket-newtab

.

__________________________________________