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It was 1999 when I first interviewed Wes Anderson, in the back of a yellow tour bus that had been rented by the studio behind “Rushmore,” his sophomore film. The un­or­tho­dox setting, as the then-29-year old filmmaker explained, was a concession to his fear of flying. When I caught up with him earlier this month by phone, Anderson was traveling by train through his home state of Texas, where he had just flown in from Germany for a screening of his latest (and ninth) movie, the stop-motion animation “Isle of Dogs.”

Obviously, much has changed for the 48 -year-old director, two of whose films (“Fantastic Mr. Fox” and “The Grand Budapest Hotel”) have since been nominated for Oscars, and who regularly hops between Paris and New York, where he and his partner, the writer and designer Juman Malouf, divide their time.

In that 19-year interval, Anderson says, the biggest change is how much easier it has become to make movies, given that he has developed what might be called a working company of actors who regularly jump at the chance to appear in his films. (Several of them are in “Dogs,” including Bill Murray, Jeff Goldblum, Edward Norton, Frances McDormand and Tilda Swinton.) More important, Anderson says, is the “whole gang of people” who regularly work behind the scenes — a gang that includes his frequent producer Jeremy Dawson, who has worked with him on five films.

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From left, Bryan Cranston as “Chief,” Bob Balaban as “King,” Koyu Rankin as “Atari Kobayashi,” Bill Murray as “Boss,” Edward Norton as “Rex” and Jeff Goldblum as “Duke” in “Isle of Dogs.” (Credit: Fox Searchlight Pictures)

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https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/why-isle-of-dogs-may-be-wes-andersons-most-timely-film-yet/2018/03/23/77e4898c-2d26-11e8-8688-e053ba58f1e4_story.html?utm_term=.56916d068373

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