Click link below picture

.

Over the past three decades, this increasingly prosperous nation has become the fattest country in Asia, with nearly half the adult population now overweight or obese. Several years ago, Dr. Tee E Siong, Malaysia’s leading nutrition expert, decided to act, organizing a far-reaching study of local diets and lifestyle habits.

The research, conducted by scientists from the Nutrition Society of Malaysia, which Tee heads, has produced several articles for peer-reviewed academic journals. But scientists weren’t the only ones vetting the material. One of the reviewers was Nestlé, the world’s largest food company, which financed the research.

Among the published articles was one that concluded that children who drank malted breakfast beverages — a category dominated in Malaysia by Milo, a sugary powder drink made by Nestlé — were more likely to be physically active and spend less time in front of a computer or television.

.

RAHMAN ROSLAN/NYT

A worker stocks milk and juices at a supermarket in Kota Bharu, Malaysia, Nov. 6, 2017. Food companies are forging deep financial partnerships with nutrition scientists, policymakers and academic societies in developing countries like Malaysia, where sales of processed foods are exploding and nearly half of all adults are now overweight or obese. (Rahman Roslan/The New York Times)

.

.

Click link below for article:

In Asia’s fattest country, nutritionists take money from food giants

.

__________________________________________