Click link below picture

.

The data for the globe comes from SEDAC, NASA‘s Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center. Each spike represents the number of people living at that location. The populations are sampled at specific points, so the tallest spike doesn’t necessarily mean that area has the densest population. It could be that the spike just happened to coincide with the center of a city. Though having worked with world population data many times before, I’d say the spikes looks more or less as I would expect. Originally the populations were based on point samples. I’ve since updated the calculation to include the area around each point. The height of each spike now reflects the total population of the rectangular cell surrounding it (each cell measures 1.4° x 0.7°).

The graphic was made with WebGL, which, if you’re not familiar with it, is a relatively new and esoteric programming library for rendering 3D graphics. By sending instructions directly to your computer’s graphics card, it allows for web-based visuals that are far more complex than would otherwise be possible, opening new possibilities for visualizing data.

.

The world’s population in 2015 (full screen version)

.

.

Click link below for article and video:

http://metrocosm.com/3d-world-population-globe/

.

__________________________________________